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Local News

Louisville Ranked Eighth in Social Media

A study from the University of Chicago ranks Louisville as the eight best social media city in the U.S.

According to a statement from the university, the “rankings reflected opportunity for citizen participation and information, including:

Categories
Local News

Louisville Metro Prepared for Snowstorms, Uses Social Media

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer says the city will use social media to communicate with the public during snow storms this year.

Fischer announced winter weather plans while surrounded by members of the city’s snow team. The public will now be able to follow updates on the Twitter feed @LouSnowPlow or the Metro Public Works Facebook page.

The city’s response to snow was made infamous in 1994 when storms forced former Mayor Jerry Abramson to close many roadways.

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Local News Next Louisville Politics

Mayor’s Staff Expecting Lively Virtual Town Hall

Mayor Greg Fischer and a team of city officials will be on hand later this month for Metro Government’s first-ever virtual town hall.

The mayor’s “Talk to Greg” community meetings are typically held at schools across the city. But on the 15th, Fischer will invite Louisvillians to submit questions and comments to him on his Facebook and Twitter pages. The mayor and his staff will read and respond to the comments from 6 pm to 8 pm.

“Our goal is to respond to everything unless we’re totally slammed,” says spokesman Chris Poynter. “He will be there, the police chief, other key directors, the mayor’s senior staff will also be there. There will probably be 15-20 people in this room, but Greg will be answering as many directly and personally as he can.”

Earlier this year, dozens of Fischer’s critics took to Facebook to post negative comments about his decision to reject No Kill Louisville’s bid to take over Metro Animal Services. Fischer has also been criticized for posting overly-optimistic tweets during disasters.

Poynter says criticisms aside, Fischer’s online presence is a sign of the times. He expects more virtual town halls to be held in the future, and Fischer has previously announced plans to put more city information and services online.

“There are many things on many peoples’ minds and if you read the mayor’s Twitter feed or Facebook page it’s everything from concerns about the neighborhoods to concerns about Whiskey row to animal control to potholes. It’s really all over the board,” says Poynter.

Fischer does read and post to Facebook and Twitter himself, but other staff members also manage his accounts.

Poynter says the virtual town hall is an experiment, but it’s something the administration would like to do more of in the future.

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Shuffle

News 2.0: The Future of News in an Age of Social Media, Part 2

Saturday, January 16, 2010 9pm

Producer: CBC News
Listen Again

For more than a hundred years, the tools of journalistic production – the ability to report, photograph and record events and distribute that material to a mass audience – have resided in the hands of a small group of people who, by convention and by law, have been called journalists.

But in this 21st century the tools of production now belong to just about everyone. Thanks to “Web 2.0” technology – blogs, wikis, social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter and video sharing sites like YouTube – billions of people can transmit text, photos, and video instantly to a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. The tools of journalism are no longer the exclusive preserve of journalists.

There is much to celebrate about this democratization of the media, but there are also reasons to be concerned about the loss of an independent, professional journalistic filter at a time when everyone can be their own media. Can online communities of “citizen journalists” be counted on to help us make informed choices as citizens and consumers? What’s lost, and what’s gained when “News 1.0” gives way to “News 2.0?”

Categories
Shuffle

News 2.0: The Future of News in the Age of Social Media, Part 1

Saturday, January 9, 2010 9pm

Producer: CBC News
Listen Again

For more than a hundred years, the tools of journalistic production – the ability to report, photograph and record events and distribute that material to a mass audience – have resided in the hands of a small group of people who, by convention and by law, have been called journalists.

But in this 21st century the tools of production now belong to just about everyone. Thanks to “Web 2.0” technology – blogs, wikis, social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter and video sharing sites like YouTube – billions of people can transmit text, photos, and video instantly to a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. The tools of journalism are no longer the exclusive preserve of journalists.

There is much to celebrate about this democratization of the media, but there are also reasons to be concerned about the loss of an independent, professional journalistic filter at a time when everyone can be their own media. Can online communities of “citizen journalists” be counted on to help us make informed choices as citizens and consumers? What’s lost, and what’s gained when “News 1.0” gives way to “News 2.0?”

Categories
State of Affairs

Employers, Privacy & Social Media


Tuesday, August 19, 2008
Employers, Privacy, and Social Media
You might use social networking sites like MySpace and Facebook to share pictures with far-away siblings, keep up with the soap opera of your best friend’s dating life, or surreptitiously look up old flames to see if they’re still cute. Your employer or potential employer could be using them, too – to see how you conduct yourself on the weekends, what you really think about your job, or whether you’re the type of person they want representing their company. This Tuesday we’ll talk about how the internet can blur the lines between our social and professional lives, in a conversation about employers, privacy, and social media.

Listen to the Show

Related Links:

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State of Affairs Blog

Lose a job to Facebook?

On August 19th State of Affairs will be discussing Employers, Privacy and Social Media. It’s a fancy title that simply means, did your pictures of you doing an upside down tequila shot at your favorite college bar cost you that great job at the accounting firm? Or you, what about those “private” pictures you posted on your blog for approved access only? Did you know your ex-boyfriend passed the access around and that’s why you are no longer teaching first grade?

Many of us have made the mistake of posting personal information in a not-so-personal space. State of Affairs wants to hear your story for our show on Tuesday, August 19th (11:00 am to 12:00 pm). Post it here, e-mail the show (soa@wfpl.org) or give us a call during the program. Or if you dare, send us a link to your blog.