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Local News Noise & Notes Politics

Raque Adams Files for State Senate

Former Louisville Metro Councilwoman and current state Rep. Julie Raque, R-Louisville, has filed to run for the state Senate in a newly-drawn district.

The seat is currently held by retiring Democratic Sen. Tim Shaughnessy, D-Louisville, but the controversial redistricting map approved by the General Assembly would have moved him out of the area by year’s end.

Adams says there are issues the Senate deals with that the House does not, and she is anxious to switch chambers and take on tax reform.

“We have to have tax modernization and we have to be aggressive with any economic development opportunities. We got to get jobs in this state. I say selfishly, I really want my kids to be able to live, work and be happy here in Kentucky and I want to participate in making this state more aggressive economically,” she says.

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Local News Noise & Notes Politics

Anti-Toll Advocate Running for State Senate

Louisville Democrat Shawn Reilly has announced his intention to run for the Kentucky state Senate next year to fill the vacancy left by retiring state Sen. Tim Shaughnessy.

The 29-year-old liberal Democrat is a financial adviser who has been involved in several local political groups and campaigns such as the anti-Iraq War movement. But Reilly is most well-known as the co-founder of Say No to Tolls, which opposes and has protested against any levy on the city’s current infrastructure to pay for the $2.9 billion Ohio River Bridges Project.

Reilly says now is the time to influence policy from the inside and that his advocacy against tolling will help him in the race.

“My work on the Ohio River Bridges Project will be a benefit to my bid for the state Senate,” he says. “So many times Louisville gets the short end of the stick in terms of funding and money that comes back from Frankfort. And if Louisville got its fair share of transportation dollars this issue of tolling wouldn’t be on the table. And Frankfort seems more than willing to put an additional tax on something they’re willing to pay for around the state.”