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State of the News

Starlings Flock to Oldham County, C-J’s Emily Hagedorn Explains: State of the News

On Friday’s State of the News, we heard about the tens of thousands of birds circling over Oldham County. It’s called a murmuration—when flocks of starlings come together and fly in dense formations—and it’s been happening nightly in LaGrange since late fall. Emily Hagedorn covered the story for the Courier-Journal, and she joined us to talk about why it might be happening and how residents are coping with the birds.

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State of the News

Today on State of the News

Segment A: We’ll talk about this week’s metro news, including U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta‘s upcoming visit to Louisville, and the end of Kentucky’s Virtual High School program.

Segment B: Kenny Colston joins us to talk about managed care companies’ claim that they’ve fixed problems with Medicaid payments, where the dropout bill and pseudoephedrine bill stand, and the future of constables in the Commonwealth.

Then we’ll hear Graham Shelby‘s conversation with filmmaker John Paul Rice, whose latest film, Mother’s Red Dress, will be screened at the Derby City Film Festival this weekend.

Do voters like their candidates talking religion on the campaign trail? The Courier-Journal’s Peter Smith brings us up to date on religious news, including research that seeks to answer that question.

Segment C: In WFPL’s Immigrant Entrepreneurs series, we met some local immigrants who have started businesses here in Louisville. Today we’ll hear a piece from Michigan Radio about the role immigrants are playing in the economic recovery throughout the Midwest. Then will speak with Dustin Dwyer, who produced the piece, about what he learned.

Finally, we’ll hear about the tens of thousands of birds circling over Oldham County. It’s called a murmuration—when flocks of starlings come together and fly in dense formations—and it’s been happening nightly in LaGrange since late fall. Emily Hagedorn covered the story for the Courier-Journal, and she joins us to talk about why it might be happening and how residents are coping with the birds (and their byproducts).

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Local News

Oldham County Little League Plays For World Series

The North Oldham County Little League team will play the last game of the regional finals against Hamilton, Ohio this Saturday. If they win, they’ll head to Williamsport, Pennsylvania for the Little League World Series.

The team is staying at the central division Little League Headquarters in Indianapolis, said manager Brad Bates.

“It’s kind of a little leaguers fantasy land here because on top of playing baseball they’re living in the dorms, coaches we live in the dorms with them, we’re with all the other teams. They’ve developed a great sense of camaraderie with some of the other players from all the other states and some of the other teams. They’ve had some downtime where they can get out and enjoy things and I think that’s by design so they can get out and they don’t feel the pressure,” Bates said.

The winner of Saturday’s game heads to the Little League World Series where they’ll have to win an 8-team tournament to represent the U.S.A. against the number one international team.

The last team from the area to win the Little League World Series was Louisville’s Valley Sports American Little League in 2002.

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State of Affairs

Getting to Know Our Neighbors in Oldham & Shelby Counties


Monday, August 3, 2009
Getting to Know Our Neighbors in Oldham & Shelby Counties
One of only eighteen counties in the state to be classified as “moist” (a dry county with a wet city), the first county in the state to have a no kill animal shelter and known as the “Saddlebred Capital of the World,” Shelby County boasts a motto of “Good Land, Good Living, Good People.” The wealthiest county in the state, Oldham County is experiencing rapid growth, already preparing for the 2010 primary for county offices and dealing with some murky water quality issues. Oldham and Shelby counties may be considered the “bedroom communities” of Louisville, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t work there to be done during the day. So, what’s new with our neighbors to the east? Join us on Monday on Oldham and Shelby counties.

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Arts and Humanities Local News WFPL News Department Podcast

Oldham County Cuts 30 Plus Teaching Positions

The Oldham County Schools are planning to cut more than 30 teaching positions. WFPL’s Elizabeth Kramer reports.

Oldham County Schools Superintendent Paul Upchurch says the school system has too many teachers. That’s because the district had projected last year’s enrollment to grow by 300 to 500 students, but it grew by only 34 students.

Upchurch says some of the teachers have been told they may lose their jobs.

“Principals have talked with them informally,” Upchruch says, “but they’ve not received any official notice yet.”

He says the district will save nearly $2 million through the cuts and that it simply couldn’t afford to keep the teachers on.

“You can do that once, but you have to correct that very soon,” he says. “So what we’re faced with now is very unfortunate; we have to pull back on about 35 of our teachers.”

Oldham County Schools has nearly 12,000 students between preschool and 12th grade.