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Defining Fairness Local News

LGBTQ Community More Than Black & White: Tiff Gonzales, Defining Fairness

Tiff Gonzales is a fourth-generation Mexican American, native to Texas, who identifies as queer both in gender identity and sexual orientation.

Tiff moved to Louisville five and a half years ago for work. She says when we talk about race in Louisville, we’re generally only talking about black and white. Latino issues re rarely part of the conversation, and when they are, it often only includes immigrants. “There’s so much that draws me to this city,” she says, “but that invisibility is something that I, on a regular basis, would struggle with to determine whether or not I can continue to live here.”

Tiff says there’s a certain loneliness in the lack of a community of folks who share similar identities. “I could name maybe just a couple of other people who I feel like would hold the identities of being a queer Latino here in this city.” But, she says, “I’m hopeful that there will be some change in that in the city that I really do love.”

When Tiff Gonzales spoke with WFPL’s Phillip M. Bailey and Laura Ellis, the conversation at one point turned to tokenism and whether the trouble with seeking diversity on panels and projects like this is that one person is asked to represent the experiences of an entire group—whether it’s race, class, LGBTQ status, etc. “I really struggled with accepting this invitation. I thought, I’m going to be put into this position where I need to answer a question as one person, for—truly, when we’re talking about Latinos in the United States—millions upon millions of people.”

“I am one person, who has been shaped by many other people, and many other experiences. I can only tell you what it’s like to be me.”

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American RadioWorks: Rising by Degrees

Saturday, December 5, 2009

Producer: American Public Media
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The United States is facing a dramatic demographic challenge: Young Latinos are the fastest-growing segment of the population, and they are among the least likely to graduate from college. Experts say the future of the American economy is at stake, because higher education is essential in the 21st century economy. This documentary tells the story of Latino students working towards a college degree—and why it’s so hard for them to get what they want.

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State of Affairs

Cross Cultural Connections


Tuesday, July 21, 2009
Cross Cultural Connections
Relationships between African Americans and Hispanics, once unified during the Civil Rights Movement, seem to be breaking down as competition for jobs, health services and housing becomes fiercer. How is Louisville being affected by “Black-Brown” tension and what is being done to promote harmony between minority groups? Cross Cultural Connections, a race relations program created by the Louisville Metro Human Relations Commission, the Louisville Urban League and the Hispanic Latino Coalition is helping to bridge the cultural gap between Kentucky’s Hispanics and African Americans, Tuesday on State of Affairs.

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