Louisville Officials Calculating Flood Damage, Considering FEMA Aid Request

Louisville Metro Government officials have been surveying flood damage to see if the city qualifies for federal aid. So far, they’ve come up about $1.7 million short. So far, about $600,000 has been spent to keep the city’s flood pumping stations active. An additional $100,000 will likely be required to clean and repair streets. That’s… Continue reading Louisville Officials Calculating Flood Damage, Considering FEMA Aid Request

Judge Says Corps of Engineers May Breach Levee

by Angela Hatton, Kentucky Public Radio A federal district judge says the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers can breach a levee in southeastern Missouri to alleviate flooding. Missouri officials had argued that the Corps’ plan to break the levee would ruin 130,000 acres of valuable farm land. But Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway, who intervened… Continue reading Judge Says Corps of Engineers May Breach Levee

Beshear Tours Western Kentucky Flood Damage

by Angela Hatton, Kentucky Public Radio Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear flew over western Kentucky today to assess the damage from storms and floods. The governor has also asked President Barack Obama for a federal disaster declaration, which would make money and other resources available for relief efforts. “We’re just making sure today that everything is… Continue reading Beshear Tours Western Kentucky Flood Damage

Beshear Requests Federal Disaster Declaration

by Dan Conti, Kentucky Public Radio Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear has sent a letter to President Barack Obama seeking a federal disaster declaration. Beshear is touring western Kentucky today to review storm damage, and a presidential declaration could make federal relief funds available. “Obviously some of the damage is unknown, yet, because we won’t know… Continue reading Beshear Requests Federal Disaster Declaration

As Damage Assessments Begin, Beshear Contemplates Federal Assistance

by Lisa Autry, Kentucky Public Radio Damage assessments in flood-damaged parts of Kentucky are underway, but the extent of the damage and the cost of recovery won’t be known until the water recedes. Governor Steve Beshear says once the costs are known, he will likely request a presidential disaster declaration. “I would think we will,… Continue reading As Damage Assessments Begin, Beshear Contemplates Federal Assistance

River Likely to Top 33 Feet Friday

Heavy rain tomorrow is expected to exacerbate flooding in Louisville, but the full effects won’t be seen until later in the week. National Weather Service hydrologist Mike Callahan says rain will fall off and on tonight  and pickup tomorrow shortly after sunrise. It will continue throughout the day, bringing enough water to raise the Ohio… Continue reading River Likely to Top 33 Feet Friday

Today on Here and Now: Floods, Google… No Connection Implied

Coming up at 1pm: The Midwest is bracing for several more days of torrential rain after powerful storms hammered Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, Tennessee and of course Kentucky yesterday. The Ohio River crest in Louisville is expected sometime tomorrow, and more heavy rain is on the way tonight and tomorrow. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers… Continue reading Today on Here and Now: Floods, Google… No Connection Implied

Ohio River Holding Three Feet Above Flood Stage

Metro Sewer District Director Bud Schardein says he expects the river to stay at 26 feet for the next three or four days, even though slightly more rain is in the forecast for Tuesday.

“Were still in a holding patter, we are operating 14 flood pumping plants. They’re doing their job, they’re pumping this rainwater that is hitting the city into the river; and there are no reports of flooding behind the walls or the levee.”

City Officials Monitoring Ohio River

The Ohio River could hit its highest level since 2005 this weekend. The river is expected to crest at 28 feet by Sunday. That’s five feet above flood stage. Executive Director of the Metropolitan Sewer District Bud Schardein says, “I think we’re in good shape right now. Everyone who’s behind the levee and the flood wall is being protected right now. All the flood pumping plants that are in operation are operating properly and doing their job,” says Schardein “so it’s more now of just watching the river and seeing if there’s going to be a spike in it or it’s going to hit its 28 feet and start dropping.”