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Local News Noise & Notes Politics

Farmer Frustrated With Coverage of Divorce

Republican lieutenant governor candidate Richie Farmer wants the media to back off and news stories about his divorce to stop because it is a private matter and hurting his children.

Farmer, who is the outgoing agriculture commissioner, vented his frustration at the 48th annual Kentucky Farm Bureau country ham breakfast.

In April, 37-year-old Rebecca Farmer filed for divorce from her husband, telling a judge their 13-year marriage was “irretrievably broken and cannot be reconciled.”

She is also seeking custody of their three children.

Since then, several news articles have appeared about the ongoing proceedings involving the former University of Kentucky basketball star, who is running on the GOP ticket with state Senate President David Williams this November.

Farmer says the media has put an unusual amount of attention on his personal life at the expense of the race and that his children are feeling the effects.

“My personal life really has nothing to do with any of this,” says Farmer. “And I have three boys and they don’t deserve any of that. Anytime that you’re going through a divorce that’s hard enough on kids. But for them to have to play it and see it in the paper and see it on the TV and have kids talk about it at school, it’s very, very difficult.”

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Local News Next Louisville Politics

Indiana Lawmakers Debate Marriage License Bill

An Indiana House committee Wednesday discussed but took no action on a proposal that would quadruple the cost of marriage licenses and certificates for couples unless they complete marriage preparation classes.

Republican bill sponsor Rep. Cindy Noe (pictured) says it’s intended to give Hoosier couples the tools they need
for a strong marriage. Under the bill, those who complete premarital classes would pay the standard $18 fee for a marriage license and certificate. Couples who don’t take the course would pay $72.

Noe chairs the House Committee on Family, Children and Human Affairs, which is considering the measure.

Fellow committee member and Democrat Vanessa Summers asked Noe whether the proposal might be heavy-handed.

“For someone that doesn’t believe in government intrusion, don’t you think this is government intrusion into the lives of people?” she said.

Noe argued that the government already steps into people’s lives in other ways.

“We just passed a ‘don’t text while you’re driving’ kind of thing. That’s government intrusion, because there’s a cost to pay,” she said.

The bill could come up for a committee vote next week.

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Shuffle

Divorced Kid

Saturday, October 9, 2010 9pm

Producer: Sasha Aslanian/American Public Media
Listen Again

Award-winning former American RadioWorks’ producer Sasha Aslanian explores the “divorce revolution” of the 1970s through the perspective of kids–like herself–who lived through it, and experts who have had three decades to make sense of it.

The documentary includes interviews with Avery Corman, the author of Kramer vs. Kramer, and the now-grown kids who wrote “The Kids Book of Divorce” in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1979.

The second half of the program examines how the experience of divorce has changed for kids since the 70s. We hear the voices of 4th and 5th graders in a court-mandated class for kids in Minneapolis as they learn how to avoid “divorce traps” kids can fall into. Aslanian follows one of the kids in the class, 10-year-old Lizzy, as she gets a new stepmom, half-brother and stepbrother, and enters adolescence. The program also features judicial reforms to improve divorce.

Categories
Shuffle

Divorced Kid

Saturday, January 2, 2010 9pm

Producer: Sasha Aslanian/American Public Media
Listen Again

Award-winning former American RadioWorks’ producer Sasha Aslanian explores the “divorce revolution” of the 1970s through the perspective of kids–like herself–who lived through it, and experts who have had three decades to make sense of it.

The documentary includes interviews with Avery Corman, the author of Kramer vs. Kramer, and the now-grown kids who wrote “The Kids Book of Divorce” in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1979.

The second half of the program examines how the experience of divorce has changed for kids since the 70s. We hear the voices of 4th and 5th graders in a court-mandated class for kids in Minneapolis as they learn how to avoid “divorce traps” kids can fall into. Aslanian follows one of the kids in the class, 10-year-old Lizzy, as she gets a new stepmom, half-brother and stepbrother, and enters adolescence. The program also features judicial reforms to improve divorce.