Voter ID law

Indiana High Court Hears Arguments In Voter ID Suit

by Rick Howlett on March 4, 2010

By Rick Howlett

Indiana’s voter ID law was the focus of arguments Thursday before the state Supreme Court.

The high court has taken up an appeal of a lower court ruling last year that overturned the state law requiring that voters produce a government-issued photo ID at the polls.

The League of Women Voters argues that that law violates the state Constitution because it imposes the requirement on only some voters. For example, those who vote by absentee ballot do not have to prove their identity.

“Other states that have enacted this kind of law have offered voters the opportunity to sign an affadavit at the polling place where they can fill it out under penalties of perjury. They can cast a regular ballot and have their vote counted. we don’t have that option here,” said Attorney Karen Celestino-Horseman, who argued before the court on the League’s behalf.

The voter ID law was passed by a Republican-controlled legislature in 2005. Critics accuse the GOP of using it to exclude those who tend to vote Democrat from casting a ballot. Republicans say it’s only intended to prevent voter fraud. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the law in 2008.

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