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Local News Politics

Study Shows Richmond Fairness Law Enforcement Would Be Budget Neutral

The Louisville Fairness Campaign has released a study that says it would not cost Richmond, Kentucky taxpayers any additional money to protect lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender residents from discrimination.

Richmond has a human rights commission, but the city does not ban discrimination based on perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. The Fairness Campaign has sought to extend those protections, but opponents say it would cost too much money to enforce. The study from the state human rights commission has found that enforcement would be budget neutral. (Read the study here.)

“Just by making a few budget tweaks here and there within the existing human rights commission, they’ll be able to reserve the funds each year that they’re not using to save for an administrative hearing when it’s necessary,” says Fairness Campaign Director Chris Hartman. 

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Local News Politics

Fairness Campaign Looking Toward Berea

The Fairness Campaign’s efforts to expand anti-discrimination laws in Richmond, Kentucky have stalled, but the organization is still focusing on other cities.

In Kentucky, only Louisville, Lexington and Covington currently have laws banning discrimination based on sexual orientation in housing and employment. The Fairness Campaign has spent months working to make Richmond the 4th city to pass such a law. But director Chris Hartman says the efforts have stalled, and there’s no estimate on when Richmond lawmakers may vote on a fairness ordinance.

“Things are moving along there, but, surprisingly, it looks like Berea is better poised to pass a local anti-discrimination fairness law than is Richmond, and we expect that once Berea passes their law, Berea may well fall next,” he says.

Hartman says the campaign’s work in cities is part of a multi-faceted approach. The campaign is also pushing for expanded protections and rights on the state and federal levels.