mercury

1:06pm: GOP presidential contender Herman Cain plans to hold a news conference in Phoenix later today to “set the record straight” about allegations of sexual harassment. Cain steadfastly denies that he ever harassed anyone. On Monday, Sharon Bialek became the fourth woman to accuse Cain of harassment, saying he made an inappropriate sexual advance toward her in 1997 while the two were in a car. At the time, she was out of work and seeking his help in finding a job. So what constitutes sexual harassment and how are these cases generally handled? We hear from an employment lawyer, who handles cases of sexual harassment.

1:12pm: While Cain denies all allegations of sexual harassment, he has also mentioned his sense of humor when addressing questions about the recent claims. Last week, Cain told the Wall Street Journal, “I do have a sense of humor, and some people have a problem with that.” Cain has also said he does not make inappropriate comments to employees, but when is taking a joke too far? Katrina Campbell of Global Compliance works with companies to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace. She says that people often get in trouble for making jokes that aren’t appropriate in the workplace. Campbell says while some people accused of sexual harassment are making a power player, others are just oblivious to the impact of their actions.

1:35pm: Half of the airborne mercury pollution in the US comes from coal-fired power plants. After years of study and debate, the Environmental Protection Agency is planning to announce new limits on mercury from coal plants in November. Meanwhile, utilities are scrambling to meet other new federal regulations and industry groups are asking the government to slow down. This is the second of a four-part series, Coal at the Crossroads. You can hear it all week on Here and Now.

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Kentucky Joins Effort to Delay Air Pollution Rules

by Erica Peterson October 11, 2011

Kentucky and Indiana are among twenty-five states seeking a delay in federal regulations to reduce mercury and other toxic air pollution. The deadline for the Environmental Protection Agency to set standards for mercury and other toxic air pollution is November 16. But twenty-five states have filed a brief in the case asking a judge to […]

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ORSANCO Holding Workshops On Pollution Law Change

by Gabe Bullard July 20, 2010

The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission, or ORSANCO, is considering a change to pollution control standards. The body will vote later this year on a measure that would let power plants apply for temporary exemptions from pollution controls.

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For National Parks, Pollution, Confusion

by kespeland November 25, 2008

The skies over Mammoth Cave National Park are already so hazy, it’s hard to see more than a few miles. Now, a confusing whirl of pending regulations and law suits is putting the future of air quality in all national parks at stake. WFPL’s Kristin Espeland reports.

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