cherokee park

The Save the Hogan’s Fountain Pavilion group is planning to attend this week’s public hearings on the city budget.

The group is trying to raise $82,000 to repair the Cherokee Park pavilion’s roof. The structure, commonly called the tepee, is not part of the Metro Parks master plan, but city officials say they’ll keep it if it can be repaired without costing the government any money.

The group has raised about a fourth of the money it needs, and co-chair Tammy Madigan they’ll lobby for city funds this week as Mayor Greg Fischer hold forums to ask for citizen input for spending in the next fiscal year.

“We are planning to attend those and talk to the mayor and anyone else who happens to be there about trying to get some work on the pavilion included in the budget for this upcoming. The level of community support certainly justifies some funding by the city,” she says.

City officials have previously said they do not plan to put any money toward repairing the pavilion.

Madigan says the pavilion deserves money from the city, because it has generated rental income for Metro Parks for years.

“We’d like to see some of the ten thousand plus dollars a year that’s generated by the pavilion rentals used to help stop the deterioration and help restore it for the enjoyment of generations of Louisvillians for years to come,” she says.

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Magazine Prize Money Going Toward Hogan’s Fountain Pavilion Preservation

by Gabe Bullard February 18, 2011

The group, called “Save the Hogan’s Fountain Pavilion” is trying to raise $82,000 to repair the roof of the structure. The pavilion, commonly called the tepee, is not in the master plan for Metro Parks, though city officials are open to keeping it if it’s repaired.

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Group Hopeful Prize Money Will Go Toward Hogan’s Fountain Pavilion

by Gabe Bullard February 2, 2011

Representatives from Reader’s Digest Wednesday presented Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s office with a $1,000 dollar check that could go toward preserving the Hogan’s Fountain Pavillion in Cherokee Park. A group dedicated to preserving the structure—often called the teepee—petitioned Reader’s Digest for the money as part of a contest the magazine was holding to fund community projects.

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Group Launches Fundraising Bid To Repair Park Pavilion

by Rick Howlett January 18, 2011

The group Save the Hogan’s Fountain Pavilion hopes to raise more than $80,000 to fix the structure’s roof.

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Public Meeting This Week for Hogan's Fountain Changes

by scrosby February 15, 2010

The Hogan’s Fountain area of Cherokee Park is in line for some updates, and the final public meeting about the changes will be held this week. Metro Parks Senior Planner Lisa Hite says it’s a heavily used section of the park, and they’re simply looking to update the area, while maintaining the Olmsted design. She […]

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An Inventory of Louisville's Art and the Care It Needs

by ekramer July 7, 2009

Serious art collectors keep careful lists of their treasures and tend to them using meticulous instructions. In recent decades, cities are starting to do the same through public art plans. Now, Louisville is cataloguing its public art and trying to figure out how to maintain its collection. WFPL’s Elizabeth Kramer reports. On a triangle of […]

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Windstorm-Felled Trees Could Invite Invasives in Parks

by kespeland September 24, 2008

Last week’s windstorm thrashed more than power lines. It tossed debris across city parks and took down hundreds of trees. Now, with new clearings and sunny spots, the parks are more vulnerable than ever to invasive species. WFPL’s Kristin Espeland reports.

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Windstorm-Felled Trees Could Invite Invasives in Parks

by kespeland September 24, 2008

Last week’s windstorm thrashed more than power lines. It tossed debris across city parks and took down hundreds of trees. Now, with new clearings and sunny spots, the parks are more vulnerable than ever to invasive species. WFPL’s Kristin Espeland reports.

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