Fund for the Arts Board Takes Action on Cowen, Will Update Strategic Plan

The action stems from a voicemail Cowen left the director of the Louisville Visual Art Association last month. The message allegedly threatened the director’s job over a letter that appeared in Business First. In the letter, the director and others wrote that many visual arts groups do not receive money from the Fund for the Arts. Cowen has apologized for his actions

In Depth: At Humana Festival, the Play’s the Thing

When you go to the theatre to see a production of a classic, think Shakespeare or even A Christmas Carol, your focus is probably on the actors. Or the director. Or the costumes and set design.

That’s because those stories are well known and part of the reason people see familiar plays is to see how an old story is being retold.  But that’s not how it works at the Humana Festival of New American Plays.

Humana Foundation Increases Support for Humana Festival

It costs Actors Theatre about $1.5 million to put on the festival, and the Humana Foundation will be contributing almost half of that. The foundation will contribute $700,000 toward the festival each year for the next three years. That’s a $25,000 annual increase over the previous award.

Actors Theatre Plans To Hire Search Firm For New Artistic Director

Actors Theatre Managing Director Jennifer Bielstein says the board will soon hire a search firm to find a new artistic director who meets the right criteria.

“A skillset in new play production and development because that is our core strength and what attracts people to us nationally and from around the world. And someone who will be a good person at developing relationships and being a goodspokesperson for the arts and for Actors Theatre in this community,” she says.

It Takes A ‘Ville Ends Run This Weekend Following Uncertainty, Success

One challenge the Second City faced in preparing It Takes a ’Ville is that the show is so Louisville-centric that no one in Chicago who watched the rehearsals got any of the jokes. It was only when the troupe performed in front of Louisvillians for the first time that they had a sense of whether or not the show could succeed.