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Frankfort State of the News

News from Frankfort with Kenny Colston: State of the News

We checked in this past Friday afternoon with Capital Bureau reporter Kenny Colston for a recap of the news this week from Frankfort. He talked about a handful of bills that have advanced or passed; proposed plans for drug testing of welfare recipients; action with “pill mill” legislation that would move the KASPER prescription tracking system to the attorney general’s office permanently; and efforts to restore voting rights to convicted non-violent felony offenders.

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State of the News

State of the News 3/9/12

The weekly news round up began today with education news from reporter Devin Katayama discussing the two new temporary locations for over 1,000 Henryville, Indiana students who lost their classrooms in Friday’s tornado storms, along with some logistics regarding transportation and use of facilities.  Kentucky state Rep. Reginald Meeks, D-Louisville, is calling on Jefferson County Democratic Party leaders to file a lawsuit that would disqualify Wendy Caswell, his Tea Party primary challenger from the race; WFPL’s political editor Phillip Bailey provided background and explanation.  Devin Katayama discussed the recent agreement signed by the Governors of Indiana and Kentucky to finance their portions of the Ohio River Bridges Project, and what it will mean to drivers using the bridges.  Erica Peterson explained how Louisville Gas and Electric’s proposal to convert the Cane Run power plant from coal to natural gas just cleared an important procedural obstacle.  Finally, arts and humanities reporter Erin Keane summarized her impressions of the Humana Festival of New American Plays at the halfway mark through the run.

In segment two, we checked in with Capital Bureau Reporter Kenny Colston for a look back at the significant events in Frankfort this week.  He discussed a handful of bills that passed, proposed plans for drug testing of welfare recipients, and efforts to restore voting rights to convicted non-violent felony offenders, among other stories.  Reporter Joe Sonka from LEO Weekly summarized his investigation and coverage of the Kentucky State Fair Board involving personnel issues and some dramatic salary increases during a time of serious budgetary shortfall.

We devoted the last segment to last Friday’s tornadoes and severe weather. Reporter Braden Lammers and photographer Chuck Branham from the News and Tribune in Jeffersonville, along with meteorologists Jay Cardosi and Monty Webb, described how the story unfolded from a weather and news perspective, and discussed the current situation in southern Indiana’s affected areas.

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State of the News

Today on State of the News

Segment A: We’ll start out with Metro news, including the latest on the Ohio River Bridges Project.

Segment B: KPR’s Kenny Colston joins us with the week’s goings-on in Frankfort, then we turn to Joe Sonka from LEO, who reported on questions raised by Fair Board records, and the attempted ouster of Fair Board CEO Harold Workman.

Segment C: We’ll spend our last segment talking about last Friday’s tornadoes. Reporter Braden Lammers and photographer Chuck Branham from the News and Tribune in Jeffersonville, and meteorologists Jay Cardosi and Monty Webb, will describe how the story unfolded from a weather and news perspective, and tell us what the situation is now in the affected areas.

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Frankfort State of the News

Weekly Round Up From Frankfort: State of the News

Friday during State of the News we checked in with Kentucky Public Radio’s Capitol Bureau Chief Kenny Colston for his review of the major news this week at the statehouse.

Topics included the PSE bill passing in the Senate, a proposal to end the state’s death penalty, legislation allowing safety reflective tape on Amish buggies, the status of UPIKE, and a proposed plan for repaying a federal loan from Kentucky’s unemployment program.

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State of the News

State of the News 3/2/12

Our weekly news round up got underway today with WFPL’s Devin Katayama describing the talk last evening by U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta at the McConnell Center at the University of Louisville.  Environmental reporter Erica Peterson described LG&E’s plans to establish a coal ash landfill in Trimble County, along with reactions of local residents.  Devin Katayama explained the controversy surrounding the new chief of diversity, community relations and communications at JCPS, a recent central office hire by superintendent Donna Hargens.  We also heard a pair of full-length news features, one from Devin Katayama concerning language instruction at JCPS, and the other from Erica Peterson about the spread of white nose syndrome in Kentucky bat populations.  Finally, we spoke with WFPL’s new Arts & Humanities reporter, Erin Keane, about the Humana Festival of New American Plays now under way at Actors Theatre of Louisville.

Kentucky Public Radio’s Capitol Bureau Chief Kenny Colston joined us in segment two with his update of the major activities this week at the statehouse.   Topics included PSE legislation, the state death penalty, safety reflectors for Amish buggies, UPIKE, and a loan to Kentucky’s unemployment program.  Then we spoke with the Washington, D.C. correspondent from the Courier-Journal, Jim Carroll, about a new superPAC with Kentucky ties, the announced retirement of Senator Olympia Snow of Maine, and other primary season news.

We got updates on some music news in segment three with WFPK’s Kyle Meredith and Sean Cannon, including the artist line up for this summer’s Forecastle Festival in Louisville, the passing of Davy Jones of the Monkees, and an interesting lawsuit filed recently by 1980s supergroup Toto.

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State of the News

Today on State of the News

Segment A: In our metro news segment, we’ll speak with WFPL’s Erica Peterson about a proposed ash landfill in Trimble County. Devin Katayama will report on Defense Secretary Leon Panetta‘s visit to Louisville this week, and Erin Keane shares her review of the Veri**on Play.

Segment B: Kenny Colston joins us with the latest from Frankfort (including today’s passage of a bill regulating PSE medicine use), and the Courier-Journal’s James Carroll has this week’s news from Washington.

Segment C: We’re joined by Kyle Meredith and Sean Cannon from our sister station, WFPK. They’ll talk about the Forecastle lineup, announced earlier this week, the legacy of The Monkees, and why the band Toto is back in the news.

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State of the News

Anne Marhsall on Race & Discipline in JCPS: State of the News

Social justice groups call it the school-to-prison pipeline. It’s a system by which children—disproportionately poor kids, black kids, victims of abuse or neglect, or those living with learning disabilities—are funneled out of public schools and into the juvenile and criminal justice systems. Once a student has been labeled by teachers as a discipline problem, that label can follow the child through adolescence (maybe becoming a self fulfilling prophecy) and into an adulthood marked by repeated interactions with the criminal justice system.

To shed some light on the beginning of this process, LEO Weekly’s Anne Marshall did an in-depth story on discipline within Jefferson County Public Schools—and how the harshest punishments tend to be disproportionately meted out to African-American students.

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State of the News

Indiana Round Up: State of the News

Friday during State of the News we checked in with two reporters from the Indianapolis Star for their take on some of the major recent stories from Indiana.

Reporter Carrie Ritchie brought us a nice summary of Indiana Ex-Secretary of State Charlie White, from it’s beginnings to his sentencing this week.

Then we spoke with Chris Sikich, who covers the Indiana General Assembly, for the latest on the Indiana smoking ban, a bill aimed at cracking down on unpopular specialty license plates, and a stage inspection bill that took shape following the State Fair stage collapse.

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State of the News

Kentucky Statehouse News Round Up: State of the News

We checked in this past Friday afternoon with Capital Bureau reporter Kenny Colston for a recap of the news this week from Frankfort.  He talked about the defeat of the proposed gambling bill, the status of the redistricting dispute in the court system, the latest on pseudoephedrine (PSE) legislation, an alternate diploma program for special needs students, and other stories.

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State of the News

State of the News 2/24/12

We started with Devin Katayama this week, who told us about the news this week that the Koch family owners of Indiana’s Holiday World, are planning to re-open Kentucky Kingdom under a new name: Bluegrass Boardwalk. Devin also caught us up on the almost-ouster-but-eventual-retention of Fair Board president Harold Workman. Gabe Bullard talked about the naming of a new police chief, Steve Conrad, and Erica Peterson had stories about a health study in Appalachia and The Kentucky Court of Appeals’ reversal of a previous ruling that restricts coal mining on Wilson Creek in Floyd County.

We kicked off our second segment with Kenny Colston, who talked about what happened this week in the Kentucky General Assembly (in case you weren’t paying rapt attention to the General Assembly this week), including the Kentucky Supreme Court upholding a lower court’s decision on redistricting.

Then we spoke with two reporters from the Indianapolis Star. Carrie Ritchie covered the sentencing of former Indiana Secretary of State Charlie White; he was ordered to spend one year of home detention and it’s still unclear who will replace him. And an Indiana Senate panel approved a statewide smoking ban this week. Chris Sikich had the latest on that, along with a bill cracking down on specialty license plates, and a new development in the stage collapse at last summer’s Indiana State Fair.

For our last segment, we stayed in Indiana for a bit with News and Tribune editor Shea Van Hoy. He reported on the still-unconfirmed Amazon distribution center, which may or may not be creating 1,600 jobs in Jeffersonville. He also talked about the unexpected departure of One Southern Indiana leader Jody Wassmer. We closed the show with a chat with LEO Weekly’s Anne Marshall, whose cover story this week looked at JCPS disproportionately imposing harsh punishments on African-American students.

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