Louisvillians Protest Against Corporate Greed, Special Interests and Political Influence

by Devin Katayama on October 4, 2011

Louisville is following in the steps of New York City’s Occupy Wall Street movement, protesting against corporate greed and the influence of money in politics.

In Louisville, two protests were organized via Facebook for Tuesday, but it was unclear where protestors were supposed to gather. Event organizer and community activist Sandy Morgan first announced the location would be at Aegon Plaza (pictured right) at Fourth and Jefferson streets downtown. That was later changed to the waterfront’s Belvedere location (pictured below) where Morgan said she acquired a permit after learning the popularity of the event. But in the afternoon, the larger group was formed and stayed at Aegon Plaza.

“A lot of these people don’t understand that it was the same thing. I posted the event for Fourth and Jefferson and then I moved it to here,” said Morgan. “There are a group of people who don’t want to leave Fourth and Jefferson. We won’t be allowed to stay there, so I’m going to occupy here,” she said.

Protests at the Belvedere location ended shortly after noon, after a group of around 25 were chanting with signs that read “Stop The War On Workers.” Many of the protestors then marched back to Aegon Plaza where a group estimated at around 100 people had formed. Some were on lunch breaks, others were just curious, and many held signs and participated in chants and songs.

Signs read “We Are The 99 Percent,” to say the nation’s top one percent holds a disproportionate amount of the country’s wealth.

The message was unclear by some who couldn’t say what specific financial reforms they agreed or disagreed with. But protestors were clear they felt injustice within the federal government.

Community activist Curtis Morrison said he’s working with a core group of 15 people who plan on staying at Aegon Plaza indefinitely. The group has been trained in civil disobedience, he said.

While the protests on Tuesday were peaceful late in the afternoon, its unclear what consequences protestors face if they decide to stay.

Morgan’s permit is good through Dec. 31 for the Belvedere location, she said.

“We all need to sit down as a group discuss this and decide what we want to do and where we want to be,” said Morgan.

Louisville Metro Government did not return phone calls.

Click here to listen to audio from Tuesday’s protest. (Voices of Sandra Morgan and Curtis Morrison)

Audio MP3

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