Christie Speculation Heats Up, Tech Jobs Grow, Wiki-Leaks Names Names: Today on Here and Now

by Laura Ellis on October 3, 2011

Now that Florida has decided to move up its GOP presidential primary, the thinking is that New Jersey Governor Chris Christie will have to decide this week whether to throw his hat into the ring for the White House. While campaign watchers wait to hear from him, the other Republican candidates are keeping an eye on Mitt Romney, whose campaign says he took in between $11 million and $13 million in the last fundraising quarter, and also how Rick Perry beat back a story on leasing a ranch with a racially offensive name. We’ll have more from Holly Bailey, senior political reporter for Yahoo! News.

With the unemployment rate stuck at 9.1% since April, job seekers are spending months, if not years, looking for work. But according to a new report by the financial services firm, Jones Lang LaSalle, high-tech jobs are growing nearly four times faster than the national average. The report also shows that venture capital is driving the job boom, with high-tech accounting for 50% of total venture capital funding over the past year. Companies say it’s difficult to find and recruit talent, because there is a dearth of qualified engineers. So what is the answer to the high-tech job glut, and can the industry sustain it? Jeanne O’Keefe, senior vice president of the Massachusetts-based firm, Mathworks, explains why the company has 250 job openings. She’s joined by Mo Koyfman, principal at Spark Capital.

All 250 thousand classified diplomatic cables in WikiLeaks‘ possession have now been made available on the web. WikiLeaks has been releasing them since last year in conjunction with news organizations like The Guardian (with names of vulnerable people, like informants, redacted). But more recently, WikiLeaks published cables that included those names — starting a new argument about the ethics of keeping and releasing secrets. We’ll find out more from Princeton bio-ethicist Peter Singer. His article in this month’s Harpers is called Visible Man: Ethics In A World Without Secrets.

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