Afternoon Review: Race-Based Discrimination in the Coal Industry, Fischer Promotes Obama’s Jobs Plan, Beshear Criticized for Skipping Debates, and a Landmark Returns to 4th Street

by Laura Ellis on September 29, 2011

The federal government has filed a lawsuit on behalf of thirteen Kentucky coal miners who say they were discriminated against over their race. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed the lawsuit earlier this week in the Western District of Kentucky against River View Coal.

Addressing local unemployment and the city’s infrastructure needs, Louisville Metro Mayor Greg Fischer is part of an official White House video campaign promoting President Obama’s jobs plan. Fischer joined the mayors of Los Angeles, Baltimore, Denver and Cincinnati, who are all promoting the American Jobs Act.

Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller says he’s reaching out to members of Congress, asking them to revisit the federal Do Not Call Act. A federal judge in Indianapolis ruled this week that the state cannot prohibit the often automated political calls made from out of state, but can still bar in-state calls.

The commuter ferry transporting residents between Southern Indiana and Louisville will shut down soon if more riders don’t take advantage of the $1 rides. The 300 passenger steamboat will operate as a ferry for at least two more weeks, said Linda Harris, CEO of the Spirit of Jefferson. At that point, Harris will decide whether to continue the service. She expects to make her decision after the Sherman Minton Bridge is fully inspected, she said.

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear is being criticized by political opponents and the press on the campaign trail this week. The Ohio-based group Restoring America has released three ads in support of Republican gubernatorial candidate David Williams with two slamming Beshear for job losses and not taking a position on busing in Jefferson County Public Schools. The governor is also being heavily criticized by political observers in the media for either skipping debates with his opponents or turning down opportunities to discuss the race in general.

The iconic Louisville Clock may soon be moved to Theater Square downtown.
Renovations to accommodate the clock at 4th Street and Broadway began this week. The relocation isn’t guaranteed, but if the clock is moved, it must be in place before the winter. It’s expected to be functional again next spring.

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