Louisville-based NCFL Releases Early Childhood Literacy Study Results

by scrosby on January 8, 2009

A report out today gives parents of very young children advice on how to better prepare them to learn to read. The Louisville-based National Center for Family Literacy directed the study by the National Early Literacy Panel.

NCFL Vice-President Emily Kirkpatrick says the five-year study yielded a number of firm results.

“Alphabet knowledge and rapid naming skills, rapid naming of letter, numbers, objects, etc., are foundational skills that children must have so they can learn to read at the appropriate age,” says Kirkpatrick.

She says now that the Literacy Panel has completed the study, her organization can take the results and translate them into practical tools parents and early childhood educators can use.

“How to actually read with your children in a way that actually expands their vocabulary and expands their letter recognition so that’s it’s not simply reading a story, but it’s reading a story with great intentionality,” says Kirkpatrick.

She says literacy skills can begin developing at birth, and the years between birth and age five are critical to setting a foundation for learning.

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