Studio 619 for December 21, 2008

by scrosby on December 26, 2008

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The Bluegrass Hotel
In the 1970s, America was swept up in a counterculture movement — and so was Bluegrass music. The epicenter for that music was in Louisville’s Cherokee Triangle neighborhood and now it’s the subject of a new documentary. Elizabeth Kramer reports.

Kentucky’s Electoral College
Kentucky’s eight Presidential Electors cast their ballots last week during a ceremony at the state Capitol. Kentucky Public Radio’s Tony McVeigh was among those who witnessed the historic event.

United States Electoral College

NADUS Films
A crew of Louisville filmmakers led by Coury Deeb is hoping to finish work soon on a documentary about the war-torn African Republic of Sudan. WFPL’s Raj Ahuja speaks with Deeb about the effort.

Save the Delta Queen
Supporters of the 82 year old Delta Queen steamboat are continuing their effort to return the paddlewheeler to service. The riverboat and National Historic Landmark was forced to drydock October 31 after its federal safety exemption was not renewed by Congress. Rick Howlett speaks with Vicki Webster of the Save the Delta Queen campaign about its latest request for help—-from the Bush administration.

Publish What You Pay
Wars throughout the world have been fueled by money from mining and oil businesses that is often unaccounted for. One notable example is the fighting in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Human rights organizations and churches are working to tackle the problem. Through an organization called Publish What You Pay, they’re encouraging laws requiring governments to publish what they earn from these businesses and for companies to publish what they pay to governments to extract natural resources. The Presbyterian Church U.S.A. is now part of Publish What You Pay and in January it is bringing Sarah Pray to Louisville. She heads the U.S. office of Publish What You Pay. Elizabeth Kramer spoke to Pray about the organization’s history and efforts to promote legislation in Congress.

The Santa Case
The 1947 film Miracle on 34th Street has charmed audiences for decades. But the holiday favorite is also a legal drama that has sometimes puzzled students of law at the University of Kentucky. Kentucky Public Radio’s Charles Compton explains in this report that was first aired three years ago.

Miracle on 34th Street

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Nori Muster December 26, 2008 at 2:38 pm

The Save the Delta Queen Campaign continues into 2009. Saving this national treasure – to keep her running – is an issue to unite all Americans. Hear the latest at Steamboats.com.

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