Studio 619 for November 9, 2008

by scrosby on November 14, 2008

Listen to the show

WFPL Post-Election Coverage

  • Kentucky voters followed pre-election polls, keeping Mitch McConnell in office and electing four Republicans and two Democrats to Congress.  Now all of them must tackle the challenges facing the nation and the commonwealth.  Gabe Bullard has more.
  • The election may be over, but democrats and republicans alike are still reeling from what happened.  Kristin Espeland spoke to some of Louisville’s youngest and oldest voters to find out what they’re making of the historic results.

Festival of Faiths

This week the Center for Interfaith Relations begins the 13th annual Festival of Faiths. This year’s theme: “Coming of Age.” WFPL’s Elizabeth Kramer spoke with the center’s Mark Steiner about what the festival aims to achieve in this community and a few of its legacies.

Lee Atwater

In the world of hardball national politics few people have made more of an impact than the late Lee Atwater. Atwater was a controversial Republican strategist and political consultant who masterminded George H.W. Bush’s victory over Michael Dukakis in the 1988 presidential race, which included the infamous Willle Horton television ad. Atwater died from a brain tumor in 1991 at the age of 41.

Lee Atwater is the subject of a new documentary by filmmaker Stefan Forbes that will air this week on the PBS Frontline program.    It’s called “Boogie Man:The Lee Atwater Story.”

Daniel Boone

Daniel Boone. For many of us the name conjures up images of a coonskin cap wearing Fess Parker from the 1960’s television show. So it’s with a heavy heart, but a eye for accuracy, that dispels the coonskin cap myth in his new biography, Frontiersman: Daniel Boone and the Making of America.

Brown takes a look at Boone from a new perspective and gives us a portrait of a man who was an adventurer, poor business man, family man, Native American friend and foe, and above all a true embodiment of the American spirit. Join WFPL’s Robin Fisher as she talks with Meredith Mason Brown about writing the life of a legend.

Joy Gleason Carew

In the first half of the 20th Century, hundreds of African-Americans left the United States to visit, and settle in the Soviet Union. Author and University of Louisville Professor Joy Gleason Carew explores this emigration in her book Blacks, Reds and Russians: Sojourners in Search of the Soviet Promise. She spoke with WFPL’s Gabe Bullard about the book.

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