Food tastes better when you can't see it?

by scrosby on April 11, 2008

This week in Studio 619, Robin Fisher dives into the world of ‘lights-out dinners’.  It’s a growing phenomenon all over the world, and stems from the widely accepted belief that in the absence of one or more of your senses, the others become more heightened. So, in this case, you can’t see anything (either because of total darkness or a blindfold), therefore your eyes aren’t distracting you from the flavors of your dish by noticing the interesting colors on the plate or, say, that fabulous handbag some lady across the room is carrying.

It actually changes the way chefs conceptualize the dinner. Lights-out dinners are coming to Louisville, you can learn more in this week’s Studio 619. For now I’m wondering if people will go for it.

When Listerine Pocket Paks came out, I remember trying to get people to try it without looking at that little piece of green paper goo, and very few people would put something in their mouth without looking at it first. This would be a whole meal!

Are you interested in the unique flavors that come out only when your sight is gone?

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