Studio 619 for March 9, 2008

by scrosby on March 14, 2008

 Quiet Zones train-tracks.jpg

Residents of the Crescent Hill and Clifton neighborhoods heard train whistles last month, and it could be a sign of things to come. The standards have changed for railroad crossings in train quiet zones and the city of Louisville can’t afford to meet the new requirements. Unless something is done, trains will once again blow their whistles when passing through Crescent Hill and Clifton. WFPL’s Gabe Bullard talked with councilwoman Tina Ward-Pugh about quiet zones and alternatives to train whistles in her ward.

Archdiocese Follow-up

It has been nearly five years since the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Louisville settled more than 240 lawsuits filed by people who were sexually abused by priests or church workers when they were children. Some of the accusations dated back more than 50 years.  WFPL’s Rick Howlett takes a look at what the church and victims’ advocates are doing to help those who were molested, and how the 200,000 member archdiocese is working to keep it from happening again.

Floyd’s Fork Project

Floyd’s Fork gushes through eastern Jefferson county, a kind of grassland and forest boundary between Louisville and its suburbs. About a hundred acres around it is public park today. But nearby parcels of land have a patchwork of owners. Now, a nonprofit called 21st Century Parks wants to link these parcels to create a 20-mile stretch of continuous trail. The question of who owns and who manages a park that will be public stirred up controversy. But new kinds of public-private partnerships may be the way forward for parks across the nation as cities struggle with new identities and new boundaries.

Arabic studies in high school

Most Kentucky high schools offer Spanish and French in their foreign language departments. But at a Bowling Green High School, a few students are now learning Arabic. Kentucky Public Radio’s Joe Corcoran reports on why they chose the language, and some of the challenges that come with it.

Severe Weather Awareness Week

Even though the areas was blanketed with snow last week, Kentucky and Indiana kicked off the spring thunderstorm season with Severe Weather Awareness Week. Stephanie Sanders spoke thunderstorm.jpgwith Joe Sullivan, the Warning Coordination Meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Louisville, about how you can prepare for severe weather, and ways you can learn about spotting dangerous weather situations.

Humana Festival of New American Plays

Playwright Marc Bamuthi Joseph infuses drama with hip-hop and autobiography in this year’s Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre.

Listen to the show.

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